Navigating an Employee Benefits Plan Design Change

Navigating an Employee Benefits Plan Design Change

Every year, companies have to decide on how much to change in their existing employee benefits. With companies seeing real annual rate increases, it can be financially painful to stick with the status quo. Companies are working with their brokers to make more frequent and significant plan design changes than ever before.

Here’s a few trends in the marketplace. In 2018, there was a 20 percent increase in the number of employers offering at least one high-deductible health plan (HDHP) compared to 2016 in their plan design. Of those on HDHPs, the use of health savings accounts is skyrocketing. In the last year alone, HSA participation grew from about 50% in 2017 to 81%. Even the makeup of voluntary employee benefits has changed drastically. Identity theft protection usage is up over 50% since 2016, while even Fido’s lot has improved with 80% more companies offering pet insurance.

Changing your plan design can be jarring for employees, especially because most employees don’t understand the basics of their insurance plan. In fact, according to the UnitedHealthcare 2017 Consumer Sentiment Survey, only 9 percent of the U.S. population showed an understanding of all four of these basic health insurance terms: plan premium, deductible, coinsurance, and out-of-pocket maximum.

What to Highlight During an Employee Benefits Plan Design Change

Companies typically hold annual open enrollment meetings to explain plan design changes. The meeting might be accompanied by the distribution of a few – often lengthy – manuals. Employees are then left on their own to make decisions throughout the year, seeking help from human resources from time to time. Enrollment meetings should be laser-focused on a few key changes within the plan design to help employees understand how they can use their benefits properly. Here are the key takeaways that employees should understand.

Premiums vs. Deductibles

As much as employers might not like the term “cost-sharing,” with the rising cost of benefits,  employers and employees are splitting the bill more evenly. For group health insurance, the cost structure basically hinges on two things: premiums and deductibles.

  • Premiums – the portion that employers and employees pay for insurance, usually on a monthly basis.
  • Deductibles – the amount of money the employee is responsible to pay before their insurance begins covering expenses (except for preventative care – usually). In general, the higher the deductible, the lower the premium.

Provider Network – Employees need to understand changes to the provider network. They should be encouraged to check if their existing doctors are still in-network on their new plan. Employees should also be encouraged to develop an emergency care plan that contains in-network hospitals, urgent care and a new primary care physician (PCP) if needed.

Formulary – If an employee is on a monthly maintenance drug, they should verify that the drug is within the same pricing tier under the new formulary plan. If the pricing has changed, they should understand the new cost before they go to the pharmacy to avoid any surprises. They could also have a doctor adjust their medications based on their new formulary.

HRA / HSA / FSA – Health savings account usage is growing but most employees don’t understand how to use them nor their enormous benefits. Understanding what’s an eligible product or the ideal time to spend your money depends on many circumstances. Providing employees with ongoing resources for these types of accounts helps to maximize their benefits. Otherwise, employees may not receive the same value and end up switching back to a more expensive plan.

Read our Employee Benefits Communication Guide for more.

Using HealthJoy To Ease Plan Design Changes

HealthJoy is designed to be the first stop for all your employees’ healthcare and benefits needs. Changing plan designs is simple with HealthJoy because the member experience stays the same. The broker and human resources work together with HealthJoy’s implementation team to update the information within our system and make note of key changes in each member’s plan design. At launch day, employees will see their new selected benefits and all their personalized information within their benefits wallet.

Deductibles are instantly visible within the benefits wallet and consistently updated for compatible plans. JOY, our virtual assistant, becomes instantly aware of changes to provider networks and formularies. JOY and our Concierge can work on helping employees find a new local PCP, make an emergency care plan and conduct an Rx Savings Review to see if any medication could be adjusted to save them money. Even health savings account balances can be accessed within our app and our Concierge can assist with any questions.

Plan design changes have previously caused employee confusion and frustration, but that changes with HealthJoy. We welcome Human Resources to lean on our team to make the transition as seamless as possible. We can even design custom onboarding so that JOY can educate your employees on key changes to their plan. At HealthJoy, our mission is to simplify the healthcare and benefits experience.

JOY Vision – Our MIT Interns Skunkworks Project

JOY Vision – Our MIT Interns Skunkworks Project

Everyone has heard the statement “artificial intelligence is going to change healthcare.” Mostly they reference how Watson is being used for healthcare diagnoses or tout a broad industry movement with little detail. At HealthJoy, AI is one of our core technical components that makes the lives of our members easier throughout their healthcare experience. Earlier this year, we had the privilege of hosting two MIT computer science and engineering students at HealthJoy for our internship program. They both specialize in artificial intelligence and neural network technologies at MIT, with prior experience at NASA, IBM Watson research lab, and more. We were extremely excited to have them on board and had the perfect project in store – JOY Vision. JOY Vision was an objective that seemed to get consistently delayed due to more immediate needs. We wanted a member to take a photo of their insurance membership card and have the different components automatically recognized and entered into our system, rather than having to wait for our team to manually input the information. This project easily falls into our mission of making healthcare as easy as possible (and leveraging A.I. to do so). It might only save a few seconds during the onboarding process but we felt it was important and would also increase data collection rates. The goal of this project might sound easy – Apple has been doing it for years in their wallet software – but there are a lot of factors that make it particularly challenging in healthcare. On the one hand, credit cards are standardized in the information they present and their formatting. Visa, Mastercard, and American Express all have strict design guidelines. Card numbers are required to be 15-16 digits long starting with specific numbers, and security codes are exactly 3-4 digits long. Issuers can’t just add additional products on a credit card with different member numbers because it’s against the guidelines (and for techies, won’t pass the credit card checksum). On the other hand, the healthcare space is basically the wild west for membership cards. The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association does have some guidelines for their cards, but once you leave the blues, all bets are off. This is especially true when it comes to TPA’s that might bundle 10 different products and include them all in a single card to save on printing. Here are the variations that we found during our early research on over 10,000 different member cards:
  • Number of digits in the member number
  • Location of member number (front / back and location)
  • Does the card have a pharmacy BIN number
  • Number of digits of a group number
  • Location of group number
  • Type of fonts – Many times different fonts are used on a single card
  • Font size – Many times they are tough to read even with the human eye
  • Line spacing
  • Kerning and tracking
  • Much more
Our interns started the project by using a wide variety of different open source and cloud-based OCR packages on the member cards to see their performance. We started by testing Google’s Tesseract, CuneiForm Cognitive OpenOCR, GOCR, Ocrad and a few others but none solved our problem on their own. Due to all the variations of membership cards, these programs recognized less than half of the member numbers, for example. We needed a custom-engineered solution that could learn over time. Step 1: Clean up that data A necessary evil in the world of data science is cleaning up data. We had already built an extensive set of tools for cleaning chat data but hadn’t worked much with images. We needed to make it easier for the system to “see” characters in an image. Further, we had to let members know when images had poor lighting or alignment. We figured out how to manipulate the image to find the borders of the card and normalize contrast and coloring to “see” the image better.  (That being said, with our neural network choice, the amount of pre-processing is actually much less than other computer vision methods) Step 2:  Build the Model Typical deep learning techniques for computer vision involve Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN, or ConvNet). This category of neural networks has proven effective in image classification and recognition. Google uses them to identify objects, traffic signs and faces in maps. You’ve probably even trained Google’s algorithm when using some of their services. Ever been required to identify a sign or store to prove you’re human?  That’s you training a CNN. Since a CNN classifies only a single item, we needed to split up all of the characters on a card and process them individually.  We then could take each letter/digit within a box and break them into separate images. Each letter/digit image could then be fed into the CNN to compare the pixel shading with other similar numbers and letters. Step 3: Find what’s important Once we addressed character recognition, our next problem was finding the data we wanted and ignoring the rest. We wanted the member’s ID number, group ID and prescription drug BIN number if included on the membership card. A BIN number is the only number that has set industry standards (# of digits), so we had to try a few automated ways to recognize the other numbers on the card. After a few days of trying different methods without a breakthrough, one of the interns found inspiration in Snapchat. Snapchat filters are fun filters that add images in real-time that track to your face. When you start to use a filter, you must first select your face on the screen. Only then does Snapchat layer on something like a warthog’s snout or bunny ears. If we required the user to quickly tap on the two or three numbers we were looking for, we could take care of figuring out the data. The user wouldn’t be required to select the data in any particular order; just three taps and they’re done. On the backend, bounded boxes are created around areas the user highlights with their finger. The coordinates (in respect to the whole card) are saved and fed into an Object Detection algorithm. The algorithm compares the location and size of each box to other insurance cards in our database. Once we have the exact location of the particular IDs, we then can easily run those characters through our model and – Voila! We now have an automated way for storing IDs with JOY Vision. Final Thoughts We would like to thank our MIT interns Haripriya and Katharina for doing an amazing job on JOY Vision. Their work will be integrated into our app over the next few months to streamline the onboarding process. It’s this type of innovative thinking and commitment to our mission that continues to make healthcare simpler, easier, and less expensive for our members.
Meet Brad Aaron – HealthJoy’s New COO

Meet Brad Aaron – HealthJoy’s New COO

The team at HealthJoy is excited to announce that we have a new Chief Operating Officer (COO), Brad Aaron. Brad brings 20 years of operational and legal experience in the technology, healthcare, and SaaS space. He has a long track record of helping build high performing teams, process and performance improvements, strategic planning and legal matters. At HealthJoy, his main focus will be streamlining processes to improve the company’s ability to scale as we onboard more clients.

Prior to HealthJoy, Brad served as the COO of MethodCare, a SaaS offering that used proprietary predictive analytics to detect anomalies and trends inpatient billing and clinical data to identify lost revenue, improve cash flow and increase patient safety for hospitals throughout the United States. Brad managed all operational aspects of the company, including finance, human resources, account management, corporate development, and all legal matters. During Brad’s tenure at MethodCare, the company experienced growth from 13 employees to almost 90 employees as revenue increased from approximately $1MM to over $25MM. Brad also managed the successful sale of MethodCare to ZirMed. Previous to MethodCare, he worked for Allscripts Healthcare Solutions, Q Interactive and FreeDrive.

“We are extremely excited to have Brad agree to a full-time role as our COO during this period of exponential growth,” said Justin Holland, Co-Founder and CEO of HealthJoy. “Brad’s leadership and operational experience will ensure that we deliver an even better client and member experience as we scale.”

Brad, We are excited to have you join us. Tell us a little about yourself.

I’m delighted to officially be part of the HealthJoy team. For the last couple of years, I’ve been consulting with several startups in the Chicago area that specialize in healthcare and education technology. I love the excitement of working with a startup and periods of high growth. Prior to that, I was COO of MethodCare for four years. They were a fast-growing HealthTech startup during my time at the company until we sold it to ZirMed.

I grew up in the Chicago suburbs, moved to Chicago after college in 1993 and love the city. During the summer I like spending time in the outdoors, playing golf and sailing. In the winter I love to cook and see live music. I went to college at Tufts University, where I got a bachelor’s degree in political science before getting my law degree at Northwestern.

So, why did you decide to join HealthJoy?

That was pretty easy actually. I’ve been consulting in the healthcare startup space for a few years and I’ve heard a lot about HealthJoy in the press. I knew that using technologies such as artificial intelligence, data mining, and virtual assistants was going to massively disrupt the healthcare and employee benefits space, so I had been keeping an eye on the company. When chatting with someone at Chicago Ventures, they thought I would be a good fit at HealthJoy and I jumped at the chance to speak with them. Once I met the team at HealthJoy, I got even more excited. The team is an amazing group of really smart and driven people that want to change healthcare.

What’s the first project you look forward to tackling at HealthJoy?

There are so many new companies coming on board as clients, so I want to help streamline the onboarding process and make it as seamless as possible for companies to roll out HealthJoy. Everyone knows that healthcare is complex, so we want to make sure that our onboarding process is dead simple to roll out. We also want to make sure we WOW new customers right from the start. I’ve already dug into the numbers and it’s incredible to see the ROI companies are getting within 30 days of rolling out our service. We want to make sure they can see those savings and we can share that story with the market.

How Employees Can Lower Healthcare Costs

How Employees Can Lower Healthcare Costs

Imagine getting a credit card from your company and never seeing the bill. Now further imagine that your company allows you to use this credit card at a restaurant whose menu doesn’t contain any prices. Wouldn’t you just eat whatever you want?  Wouldn’t you order the filet mignon and the finest bottle of wine that the waiter recommends without a concern in the world? This scenario sounds strange but it happens every day in the world of healthcare. Companies provide health insurance to employees with little guidance on how to use it and no incentive for employees to shop for healthcare and lower healthcare costs.

According to the Health Care Cost Institute’s 2016 report Spending on Shoppable Services in Health Care43% of the $524.2 billion spent on healthcare by individuals with employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) in 2011 was spent on shoppable services. For a healthcare service to be considered to be “shoppable,” it has to be a common, standard healthcare service that can be priced and researched before the service is performed; there must be competition for the service within the market the user is in and access to data about quality and prices must be available. These shoppable expenses are the secret to lower healthcare costs.

Healthcare’s Massive Price Variations

To really understand the price variations involved, let’s take a look at 4 different procedures and see the potential in price ranges we’ve seen from our employer clients.

Colonoscopy – Screening for colon cancer should begin after the age of 50 for most people. If a colonoscopy doesn’t find any benign tumor or cancer and there is no family history of issues, tests should then occur every ten years. If any benign tumor is removed, the exam should be repeated every five to ten years, sometimes even more frequently. We’ve seen prices for colonoscopy vary from only $550 to $2,200 (4X) in a given market, for a potential savings of $1,600 per colonoscopy.

MRI – MRIs are a very common test that uses a magnetic field and radio waves to produce detailed pictures of the body’s organs and structures. We’ve seen prices of an MRI for the lower back in New York City range from only $450 to an exorbitant $4,500, an insane 10X difference in pricing – a potential savings of $4,050 for a single MRI.

Knee arthroscopy – Knee arthroscopy surgery is performed 2 million times worldwide each year to diagnose and treat problems in the knee joint. Prices vary from a little under $1,000 to over $6,000 (6X) for a potential savings of $5,000 for the surgery.

Mammograms – A mammogram is an x-ray procedure that allows doctors to look for changes in breast tissue and can often find or detect breast cancer early. It’s recommended for women over the age of 45 to have them performed every year or two. We’ve seen prices during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month for only $50 to prices of over $1,000 (20X price different) for a potential savings of $950.

If you have 1,000 employees and are self-funded, you could have over $4,300,000 of shoppable expenses every year. It becomes really easy to understand that encouraging employees to start shopping for prices before they consume healthcare can lower healthcare costs, but how do you get them to do it?

The Difficulties In Getting Employees to Price Shop

Over the last 10 years, most employers and insurers have added tools to their websites that estimate the costs of different procedures to allow employees to shop around. The feedback from employers has been that these tools rarely get used, no matter how good they are. When trying to encourage employees to use these tools, there are basically two strategies: the carrot or the stick.

The Carrot – Many employers have started to offer cash and other incentives, such as free diapers to pregnant employees, to encourage them to use existing tools and price shop for services to lower healthcare costs. Basically, a reward will be given if an employee chooses a less expensive alternative for care. Rewards have proven effective at changing behavior and can work on a percentage of the population.

The Stick – Over the last few years, we’ve seen a shift to high-deductible (HDHP) or tiered health plans to force employees to pay more out of pocket. The expectation is that, since they have to pay out of pocket more, they will price shop more. Twenty-nine percent of covered workers are now enrolled in HDHPs, so companies believe they can change behavior with plan design. Early results, however, indicate it’s not as effective as the carrot approach.

The HealthJoy Approach to Lower Healthcare Costs

Our goal is to make healthcare easy for employees and become an employee’s first stop for all their healthcare needs. Since we combine many features in our app – a benefits wallet, online doctors, helpful healthcare Concierges and a proactive artificial intelligence called JOY – we become a natural first destination for employees.

Our mission is to guide employees into making the best healthcare decisions both from a health and cost perspective. Rather than provide them with a do-it-yourself tool and make an employee perform research, we handle everything for them. Our healthcare Concierge team are experts in finding the highest quality services that also are most cost-effective for both the employer and employee. When providing any recommended service, we’ll work in a cost analysis and provide the best results to lower healthcare costs. We even use artificial intelligence and machine learning to help our staff sift through huge data sets when doing research.

We can work with any health plan including high-deductible and tiered plans and can even integrate employee rewards into our system. We make it extremely easy and seamless for employees to turn to us. This has led to our having the highest utilization rate in the industry and delivering quick ROI for our employers.

telemedicine and hdhp
Telemedicine Benefits Guide

Telemedicine use is growing at an exponential rate. In this guide, we’ll share our best tips on how to make this underutilized benefit work better for your company.

Learn more »
PEOs: Is Outsourcing Human Resources the Answer?

PEOs: Is Outsourcing Human Resources the Answer?

Human resource administration can act as a significant drag on small to midsize companies, often affecting their bottom line. Professional Employer Organizations (PEOs) are built to solve this problem. As a separate third-party, their exclusive focus is to manage a company’s HR services, including payroll administration, worker’s compensation benefits, health benefits, regulatory compliance, and other various HR support tasks. Their business model of outsourcing HR can offer companies a competitive edge, and more time and resources to devote to the goals their company was built to achieve.

Today, around 14-16 percent of small businesses partner with a PEO to administer their HR and employee benefits. The PEO industry holds between $136 and $156 billion in annual gross revenues and has undergone significant growth since it first took root 30 years ago.

How Does a PEO Work?

Businesses and PEOs partner together in a unique arrangement known as co-employment. Put simply, co-employment means that the PEO contractually shares some employer responsibilities with their client. A Client Services Agreement (CSA) contract outlines the PEO’s roles, which may be defined, for example, as:

  • Sharing employment responsibilities with the client such that the client maintains its responsibility for its product or service
  • Reserving the right of directing employees in regards to certain matters
  • Remitting employee wages and withholdings
  • Issuing W-2 forms for employee compensation
  • Handling employment taxes and reporting them to local, state, and federal government authorities

Specific roles of the PEO differ with each individual agreement, and every PEO offers a unique set of services. However, the co-employment is a standard arrangement for all PEOs and their clients.

Ultimately, co-employment allows the PEO to take over time-consuming HR functions for the client, while simultaneously permitting the client to benefit from the PEO’s robust HR, benefits, payroll, and tax infrastructure. The PEO becomes the “Employer of Record”, taking over all formal administrative HR tasks, while the client continues to exist as the “Worksite Employer”, responsible for the day-to-day management and supervision of employees at the worksite. Both the PEO and its client maintains a strong engagement with employees. PEOs interact with worksite employees primarily through HR channels, whereas the client company interacts with employees in the context of day-to-day operations and production of the company’s goods or services.

What Does a PEO Cost?

There are a few different approaches that a PEO might charge their clients in exchange for their HR services. The first option is charging a fixed percentage of a company’s payroll. Typically, this percentage lies between 3 and 8 percent of the total payroll for a given pay period. For example, the PEO might charge 4% of their client’s total payroll, which is 4% of the gross wage that all employees earned during the payroll period.

Alternatively, a PEO may charge clients a flat fee per employee. This fee may be incurred on a monthly, yearly, or per-check basis. Oftentimes, a PEO will offer several different payment strategies, and allow companies to choose the strategy that is most cost-effective for their individual case. For example, a company with large fluctuations and variation across pay cycles may benefit from paying a flat fee per employee. On the other hand, a company with a large number of part-time employees would lose out by paying a flat per-employee fee and may instead want to choose a payment that is based on a percentage of their total payroll.

Why do PEOs offer companies an advantage?

A recent white paper from the National Association of Professional Employer Organizations (NAPEO) found that the revenue growth of PEO firms was twice as high as that of comparable non-PEO firms (NAPEO, 2017). It also found PEO users to have lower employee turnover and significantly lower rates of going out of business. The competitive edge that PEOs provide stems from their specialization, expertise, and large employee pool, all of which lead to efficiency and cost-containment in operations.

A Master Plan for Benefits Administration

First, because of the sheer size of their employee pools (typically thousands of lives), PEOs are able to offer incredibly competitive large-group health plan rates to their clients. These plans simultaneously provide high-quality coverage and low rates that a small to midsize business would be unable to achieve on its own. These plans are made possible through the PEO’s master benefits plan– an aggregation of all of the PEO’s smaller groups’ employees under the umbrella entity of the PEO. Insurance carriers and PEOs find it mutually beneficial to negotiate low rates: the carrier wins the enrollment of the PEO’s large pool of employees, and the PEO is able to secure low premium rates.

The same advantages that PEOs enjoy in regards to health insurance plans apply to all other forms of employee benefits. In fact, PEOs give access to 401(k) plans, dental and life insurance, dependent care, and other benefits that are often difficult for small businesses to provide on their own. Without a PEO, small businesses are subject to community-rated policies that do not stack up against the benefits offerings of larger companies. Still, companies should be wary of high rate increases or even termination of coverage under the master benefits policy should they incur catastrophic claims or exhibit poor performance.

Streamlining HR Operations

PEOs also offer streamlined operations through experienced professionals who specialize in HR administration. Not only have these professionals mastered the art of efficient administration of payroll, accounting, and legal duties, but they possess the know-how needed to tackle tough employee situations (discrimination allegations, complex benefits arrangements, etc.) that would pose a headache for firms who have never dealt with such issues.

Compliance is a realm where PEO expertise can potentially save employers a lot of hassle. Navigating the regulatory sphere, whether it be at a local, state, or federal level is daunting, to say the least. Employers face increasingly complex regulations at every corner, whether it be in HR, health care, or taxes. Employment laws are constantly evolving, making it more and more difficult to navigate and stay compliant in order to avoid fines. Small and midsize businesses (SMBs) breathe easy after partnering with a PEO, because their HR services maintain compliance with changing laws, as they are constantly updated by specialists with extensive regulatory knowledge. This is especially beneficial for multi-state firms, who have to juggle different and complex employment practices in every state since each has their own set of unique employment laws.

Also, companies with high workers’ compensation risk can benefit greatly from the protection of a PEO. Although firms often don’t anticipate workers comp claims until it’s too late, these claims are often so devastating that they can compromise the financial stability of an SMB. Luckily, PEOs provide strict return-to-work policies and investigation of questionable or fraudulent claims in order to minimize claims costs. In addition, PEOs carefully manage workers’ comp deadlines, updates in any laws, and documentation to ensure that costly mistakes are not made.

HR Tech and the PEO Industry

PEOs get excited about HR Tech because it concerns their core business. These technologies might look like anything from an employee recruitment software, to an employee wellness program, to a comprehensive employee benefits guidance app. These technologies have the potential to not only simplify the HR functions that PEOs outsource for their clients, but also to add significant value and employee engagement for the many individuals whose employers partner with a PEO.

PEOs that currently make the most out value-adding HR tech are seen as ever-more attractive to their prospective clients, who are always looking for ways to improve their employee retention and attract top talent. The best HR tech tools offer the double-sided advantage of improving employee benefits packages while simultaneously achieving cost-savings for the employer. For example, HealthJoy is a healthcare benefits app that employees can use to dynamically engage with their own health coverage, which naturally leads to lower costs for their employers.

PEOs Give Employers More Time for Their Bottom Line

The Professional Employer Organization offers a competitive edge and increased survivability for businesses during a time where small advantages can make a critical difference. When a small to midsize company is stretched thin, it can be overwhelming to run daily HR operations that aren’t contributing to sales or revenue but are still essential. PEOs free up the time and resources devoted to HR administration so that employers are free to focus on what matters most– growing their business and delivering their bottom line. More and more, businesses are finding it hard to ignore the returns on efficiency, stability, and affordability that the PEO brings to the table.

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type='text' value='' class='large' placeholder='Company name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_12_6" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_12_6' >Company Size<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_select'><select name='input_6' id='input_12_6' class='large gfield_select' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" ><option value='' selected='selected' class='gf_placeholder'>Company Size</option><option value='1-100' >1-100</option><option value='100-500' >100-500</option><option value='500-3000' >500-3000</option><option value='3000-1000' >3000-1000</option><option value='10000+' >10000+</option></select></div></li><li id="field_12_7" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_12_7' >Which Best Describes You?<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_select'><select name='input_7' id='input_12_7' class='large gfield_select' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" ><option value='' selected='selected' class='gf_placeholder'>Which Best Describes You?</option><option value='Employer' >Employer</option><option value='Benefit Consultant' >Benefit Consultant</option><option value='TPA' >TPA</option><option value='PEO' >PEO</option><option value='Other' >Other</option></select></div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_12' class='gform_button button' value='Get Your eBook' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_12"]){return false;} window["gf_submitting_12"]=true; ' onkeypress='if( event.keyCode == 13 ){ 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[gravityforms id=1]
<div class='gf_browser_unknown gform_wrapper gform_legacy_markup_wrapper' id='gform_wrapper_1' > <div class='gform_heading'> <h3 class="gform_title">State of the Benefits Survey eBook - 1-Col</h3> <span class='gform_description'>Testing form</span> </div><form method='post' enctype='multipart/form-data' id='gform_1' action='/blog/2018/03/' > <div class='gform_body gform-body'><ul id='gform_fields_1' class='gform_fields top_label form_sublabel_below description_below'><li id="field_1_8" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_1_8' >First Name<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_8' id='input_1_8' type='text' value='' class='large' placeholder='First Name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_1_9" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_1_9' >Last Name<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_9' id='input_1_9' type='text' value='' class='large' placeholder='Last Name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_1_4" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_1_4' >Email<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_email'> <input name='input_4' id='input_1_4' type='text' value='' class='large' placeholder='Email' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_1_5" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_1_5' >company name<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_5' id='input_1_5' type='text' value='' class='large' placeholder='Company name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_1_6" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_1_6' >Company Size<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_select'><select name='input_6' id='input_1_6' class='large gfield_select' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" ><option value='' selected='selected' class='gf_placeholder'>Company Size</option><option value='1-100' >1-100</option><option value='100-500' >100-500</option><option value='500-3000' >500-3000</option><option value='3000-1000' >3000-1000</option><option value='10000+' >10000+</option></select></div></li><li id="field_1_7" class="gfield gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_1_7' >Which Best Describes You?<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_select'><select name='input_7' id='input_1_7' class='large gfield_select' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" ><option value='' selected='selected' class='gf_placeholder'>Which Best Describes You?</option><option value='Employer' >Employer</option><option value='Benefit Consultant' >Benefit Consultant</option><option value='TPA' >TPA</option><option value='PEO' >PEO</option><option value='Other' >Other</option></select></div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_1' class='gform_button button' value='Get Your eBook' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_1"]){return false;} window["gf_submitting_1"]=true; 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[gravityforms id=9]
<div class='gf_browser_unknown gform_wrapper gform_legacy_markup_wrapper' id='gform_wrapper_9' > <div class='gform_heading'> <h3 class="gform_title">10 Benefits Presentation Tips from TED Talks eBook - 2-Col (Pop-up)</h3> <span class='gform_description'></span> </div><form method='post' enctype='multipart/form-data' id='gform_9' action='/blog/2018/03/' > <div class='gform_body gform-body'><ul id='gform_fields_9' class='gform_fields top_label form_sublabel_below description_below'><li id="field_9_8" class="gfield gf_left_half gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_9_8' >First Name<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_8' id='input_9_8' type='text' value='' class='large' placeholder='First Name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_9_9" class="gfield gf_right_half gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_9_9' >Last Name<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_9' id='input_9_9' type='text' value='' class='medium' placeholder='Last Name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_9_4" class="gfield gf_left_half gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_9_4' >Email<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_email'> <input name='input_4' id='input_9_4' type='text' value='' class='medium' placeholder='Email' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_9_5" class="gfield gf_right_half gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_9_5' >Company name<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_5' id='input_9_5' type='text' value='' class='medium' placeholder='Company name' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" /> </div></li><li id="field_9_10" class="gfield gf_left_half gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_9_10' >Company Size<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_select'><select name='input_10' id='input_9_10' class='large gfield_select' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" ><option value='' selected='selected' class='gf_placeholder'>Company Size</option><option value='1-100' >1-100</option><option value='100-500' >100-500</option><option value='500-3000' >500-3000</option><option value='3000-1000' >3000-1000</option><option value='10000+' >10000+</option></select></div></li><li id="field_9_7" class="gfield gf_right_half gfield_contains_required field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_9_7' >What Describes You?<span class="gfield_required"><span class="gfield_required gfield_required_asterisk">*</span></span></label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_select'><select name='input_7' id='input_9_7' class='large gfield_select' aria-required="true" aria-invalid="false" ><option value='' selected='selected' class='gf_placeholder'>What Describes You?</option><option value='Employer' >Employer</option><option value='Benefit Consultant' >Benefit Consultant</option><option value='TPA' >TPA</option><option value='PEO' >PEO</option><option value='Other' >Other</option></select></div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_9' class='gform_button button' value='Get Your eBook' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_9"]){return false;} window["gf_submitting_9"]=true; 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